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Howell Tractor Hosts Kawasaki Loader Rebuild Event - May 11, 2013 - Construction Equipment Guide - Print/Online
Read full article here

Howell Tractor and Equipment held its "Kawasaki Rebuild/Safety Award Luncheon" April 26 at Howell Tractor's Gary, Ind., facility.

Howell took the opportunity to enlighten its service customers on its rebuild/service capabilities while at the same time giving employees an opportunity to showcase their quality workmanship and pristine work facility.

The luncheon also was an opportunity for Howell Tractor to thank and recognize its employees for their focus and commitment of work 6 years 625,000 hours without a lost time accident.

Download PDF article here
 
 
OneSteel Recycling has the recipe for success in scrap with the help of a Kawasaki 115ZV-2 - March 2013 - Recycling Product News - Print/Online
Read full article here

"Our purchasing the Kawasaki 115ZV-2 wasn't so much a sales pitch from Kawasaki than a testimonial from JVS Contracting, a local demolition contractor, as well as our own mechanics," explains Tommy Quirke, President, OneSteel. "GS Equipment has taken very good care of us. Since they are a Sennebogen dealer as well, it makes it easier ? a one-stop shop. When it comes to equipment buying, I go by what my guys tell me. They are very pleased with the power in the Kawasaki."

"That was one of the selling points for us about the Kawasaki," notes Quirke. "It could move those grapples around for us." Luis Garivdi, who operates the Kawasaki 115ZV-2 says he couldn't be more pleased. "The Kawasaki has lots of power!" he says. "I noticed that right away. With the addition of the centre support for lifting, we can now move a grapple in just 10 minutes and position it exactly where we want to. It used to take an hour."

 
 
Advances Anchor 95Z7's New Design - February 2013 - Construction Equipment Magazine - Print/Online
Read full article here

Watch the field test video here

In-the-dirt applications give operator-trainers an opportunity to evaluate Kawasaki's newest wheel loader, engineered to boost production and save fuel

"We've tried as much as possible to keep the machine simple, but that isn't easy when you have a model with the features available on the 95Z7" ...Gary Bell, vice president, Kawasaki Construction Machinery America (KCMA).

Construction Equipment recently had the chance to borrow the first 95Z7 available in North America for a day's evaluation with professional operators Chris Tomblin and Lucas Scanlon at Local 150's (Operating Engineers) training facility in Wilmington, Ill.

Although much has changed on Z7 models, says Bell, the company's fundamental design philosophy remains at the heart of the new machines.

"We try to keep everything as durable and traditional as possible with this kind of machine," says Bell. "Fortunately, the Z7 Series' Intellitech control system combines advanced machine 'intelligence' with an intuitive operational simplicity, which means that the machine itself can determine factors within its operating environment and react appropriately, without the operator having to change settings, push buttons, or flip switches."

New Control Features

Tomblin's first comment when arriving with the machine was how rapidly it shifted as he traveled the quarter mile or so to the site.

KCMA's Mike Dixon, regional product support manager, explained that the Z7 Series has a number of new electronic control features, among then a Flex Shift system that automatically alters shift points based on speed and load. The purpose, he said, is to optimize cycle time and to save fuel. He added, though, that a "shift delay" feature that lengthens the shift intervals can be selected through the machine's monitor if the operating situation demands.

Variable-Displacement Hydraulics

Local 150's Scanlon summed up both operators' take on the 95Z7's hydraulic action: "I thought the hydraulics were really fast on the machine - no problem there."

The Z7 Series is the first of Kawasaki's loaders to use a load-sensing hydraulic system, which incorporates variable-displacement pumps and an open-center valve, a design, says KCMA's Bell, more typical of hydraulic excavators than wheel loaders.

Preference for the "Power" Mode

The design feature most discussed by the Local 150 operators was the 95Z7's ability to boost its engine speed by a significant amount to increase power.

If the machine only needs a short burst of power - for negotiating a steep grade or for getting through a spot of particularly hard digging, says Kawasaki - the operator can push the Quick Power button (on the tilt lever), which stays engaged until the transmission shifts. For sustained higher power, the operator can engage the machine's Power Mode switch on the right console.

"We want to the give the operator the flexibility to get good fuel economy," says Bell, "so the Z7 series provides the choice of selecting a 'normal' operating mode or a 'power' mode. The system defaults to its normal mode."

Given the material and conditions on site, both Local 150 operators preferred to operate with the power mode switched on. As noted, the machine was handling heavy material in both the truck-loading exercise and a load-and-carry exercise, the latter of which required the 95Z7 to traverse an initial flat segment of approximately 500 feet, make a 180-degree turn at the base of a 70-foot uphill ramp (estimated at a 3-to-1 slope), travel up and over the ramp, then return along the initial flat segment.

"When we were loading trucks without the power mode switch on, the machine dug into the pile and did the job, no problem. But to be honest, I preferred running with the switch on - then the machine has all kinds of power."

Operator's Station, Serviceability

"The cab is roomy and very comfortable," said Tomblin. "I thought that using the monitor to set boom kick-outs and to change the setting on the converter lock-up was quite easy. It wasn?t difficult to navigate; everything is there for you."

Both operators though the 95Z7's service access was convenient and safe: "Christ and I were both impressed with the serviceability aspects of the machine," said Scanlon. "It's wide open - the way the fenders swing out and lock and the inner panels hinge up and lock - you don't have to be concerned with the panels shutting or falling on you. You can get to service points with no problem."

"It's a very solidly built machine," said Tomblin. "It's well put together and has all the bells and whistles that an operator might want."
 
 
Kawasaki Loader Goes the Distance for Kinsella Quarries - February 13, 2013 - Construction Equipment Guide - Online
http://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/story.asp?id=19822

You wouldn't be wrong if you said Doug Eaton and the 2002 Kawasaki 95ZV he operates have aged together. Eaton, who has worked at Kinsella Quarries since he was 16 years old, has spent 20,000 hours operating this loader, which has more than 25,000 hours on it.

"We needed to add to our fleet or I never would have made this purchase," said Thomas Kinsella, Kinsella Quarries? president. "The old loader is operating just fine."

And by fine Kinsella means running daily, continuous operation for five or six days a week, every week, and never having experienced a major failure during its 25,000 hours in service.

Kinsella looked hard at cost of operation. To determine that, he considered initial investment, fuel consumption, maintenance cost, and longevity. After reviewing all of these factors it became clear to him that he should stick with Kawasaki. He subsequently purchased a new Kawasaki 95ZV-2.
 
 
Kawasaki Lends a Hand with Winter Storm Nemo - February 11, 2013 - The Weather Channel

A Kawasaki 65ZV-2 was spotted on The Weather Channel helping out with the nasty blizzard in the Northeast!

 
 
The 95Z7 is Aggregates Manager's Editor's Pick of January 2013 Rollouts - January 2013 - Aggregates Manager - Online/Print

Aggregates Manager has named the Kawasaki 95Z7 as their editor's pick for January 2013 rollouts! They made particular note of the machine's "striking new appearance", smooth shifting, intelligent adaptation to work environments, and improved visibility, serviceability, fuel economy, and performance.

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Kawasaki Listed in Construction Equipment's Top 100 of 2012 - Construction Equipment - Online
http://www.constructionequipment.com/products/top-100/2012

In evaluating products for the Top 100, Construction Equipment editors look for advances in technology, new product lines, significant improvements to existing products, or a product that increases competition in its field. Below you'll find our choices for Top New Products of 2012, including earthmoving, paving, lifting, trucks and more.

HEAVY EARTHMOVING



Kawasaki Overhauls Wheel Loader Line
 
 
Kawasaki's Rebuild Center Featured in Equipment Today - November 19, 2012 - Equipment Today - Online/Print
http://www.forconstructionpros.com/article/10819127/rebuilt-loaders-cut-production-costs

Tier 4 Changes the Game

There has been a change in the equation to calculate the economic life of a wheel loader. "The introduction of Tier 4 machines will make a significant impact on the rebuild or buy new decision," says Gary Bell, KCMA. "Tier 4 machines will have a more limited used machine demand due to the fact that they cannot be used in traditional used equipment third-world countries

"At the same time, if governmental regulations force customers to get rid of old machines rather than rebuild them, this could also cause less rebuilding," he indicates. "But if the customer can rebuild a Tier 3 or older machine, he may opt to do that rather than pay higher prices for Tier 4 models."

Size Up the Decision

Gary Bell, vice president-general manager, KCMA Corp., explains,

  "The labor to do a full rebuild is roughly the same for a small machine as for a larger machine. So as a percentage of the value, labor is too high for machines under 5 to 6 yds. It also depends on the usage before and after rebuilding. We rebuild hot slag machines because they have very low resale value, even at low hours. So it is often more economical to rebuild a machine with 10,000+ hours for a second or even third life than it is to try and trade it in for a low value and buy new."

Quarries often rebuild machines, as well. "This has to do with how they depreciate their equipment," says Bell. "Once they get through the initial depreciation period, they can operate at a lower internal cost. So they often want to continue to operate a machine that has been fully depreciated. Also, capital budgets often are harder to get than maintenance budgets and rebuilds are often handled by maintenance budgets, not capital."

As Good As New

"Generally, the properly rebuilt unit will be as productive as it was originally," says Bell. "Most rebuilds happen when the machine is over five years old, which is the normal spread between new models. Often, new models have performance, reliability or operational features that may make them more desirable than a rebuild on that basis."

Determining the Rebuild Interval

Assessing when to rebuild can be tricky. "You would normally use a combination of operating hours and oil sampling results to determine the rebuild timing," says Bell. "More sophisticated customers track overall operational costs closely and make a decision when they see operational costs increasing. This is more of an art than a science."

Hydraulics typically need to be rebuilt before most powertrain components. "Transmissions then engines and axles would be the normal progression for the powertrain, but the customer may rebuild everything at once if that is more efficient," says Bell.

Kawasaki completely redesigns 957 Wheel loader with new styling and enhanced performance.
 
 
Kawasaki's 95Z7 16-liter engine largest in class - November 09, 2012 - Online
http://www.equipmentworld.com/kawasakis-95z7-16-liter-engine-largest-in-class/

Kawasaki's 95Z7 wheel loader has been redesigned to meet EPA Tier 4 Interim emission standards, as well as to improve operating efficiency and productivity.

The 388-horsepower machine is equipped with a 7.3-cubic-yard bucket and features a striking new appearance, with a hood design that improves rear visibility and serviceability.

The 16-liter Isuzu 6WG1 diesel engine is the largest in the class. The big planetary automatic-shift transmission has automotive-style smooth shifting from pulse width modulation in the control valve and features a lock-up torque converter to improve fuel economy and performance. The machine's IntelliTech System uses inputs from the machine to adjust performance to match the conditions.

Many operations are automatic, while others allow the operator to select functions appropriate for the application or work environment. Diagnostic systems have been improved to allow more detailed data access to troubleshoot issues quickly and accurately. Serviceability has been improved with easy access to the engine, cooling system cores, and filters.
 
 
Kawasaki Unveils its All-New 95Z7 Wheel Loader - November 7, 2012 - Construction Equipment Guide - Online
http://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/Kawasaki-Unveils-its-All-New-95Z7-Wheel-Loader/19222/

Kawasaki unveiled its all-new 95Z7 wheel loader, a machine that has been completely redesigned to meet all EPA Tier IVi emission standards as well as to improve operating efficiency and productivity. At 388 net hp (289 kW) and equipped with a 7.3 cu. yd. (5.6 cu m) general purpose bucket, this production class loader is a pace setter in the industry.

The 95Z7 was introduced at a two-day event in Pine Mountain, Ga., on Oct. 29 and 30.

The most obvious change to the 95Z7 is its overall appearance. These styling changes are functional as well as aesthetic. The hood design improves rear visibility and serviceability.

The powertrain for the 95Z7 provides power and durability. The reliable and fuel efficient Isuzu 6WG1 diesel meets all Tier IVi emission standards with the use of cooled exhaust gas recirculation and diesel particulate filter or exhaust filter systems. The 16-L engine is the largest in its class.

The big planetary automatic-shift transmission has automotive-style smooth shifting from pulse width modulation in the control valve. This transmission also has standard lock-up torque converter to improve fuel economy and performance. Plus the 95Z7 has standard traction control and torque proportioning differentials to reduce wheel spin and extend tire life.

The service brakes are mid-mounted for high capacity and cool operation and the final drives are outboard mounted for easy access.

The totally redesigned hydraulic system uses reliable, high-performance Kawasaki variable displacement piston pumps that improve fuel efficiency.

The operator station is roomy and provides excellent visibility, controllability and comfort to optimize productivity.

Diagnostic systems have been improved to allow for more detailed data access to troubleshoot issues quickly and accurately. Serviceability is improved with easy access to the engine, cooling system cores and filters. Oil change intervals have been increased for the engine and hydraulic systems to reduce overall operating costs. Cooling fan efficiency is improved with aerodynamic designs to improve air flow and cooling efficiency.

Not only did the Kawasaki 95Z7 introduce many new features, but it also retained several of the heavy-duty structural features that it has become famous for. Things like dual Z-linkage, box section frames, base-mounted boom cylinders and heavy- duty center pin designs make the 95Z7 the strongest machine in its class, according to the manufacturer.
 
 
A Whole New Look - November 7, 2012 - Construct Arabia - Online
http://www.constructarabia.com/construction-product-news/a-whole-new-look/

Kawasaki's all new 95Z7 wheel loader has been completely redesigned to meet all EPA Tier 4i emission standards as well as to improve operating efficiency and productivity.

At 388 net horsepower and equipped with a 7.3 cubic yard General Purpose bucket, this production class loader is a pace setter in the industry.

The 95Z7 has received a complete facelift with styling changes. The hood design has also been reworked to improve rear visibility and serviceability.

The powertrain for the 95Z7 provides power and durability. The largest available engine at 16 liters, Isuzu 6WG1 diesel engine uses Cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Diesel Particulate Filter or Exhaust Filter systems.

The automatic-shift transmission has automotive-style smooth shifting from pulse width modulation in the control valve. This transmission also has standard Lock-up Torque Converter to improve fuel economy and performance. The 95Z7 has traction control and torque proportioning differentials to reduce wheel spin and extend tire life.

The Kawasaki variable displacement piston pumps that are part of the hydraulic system is said to improve fuel efficiency. The operator station is spacious and provides improved visibility and controllability.

Along with several new features, the 95Z7 carries forward applications from the previous model such as dual Z-linkage, box section frames, base mounted boom cylinders and heavy duty center pin designs make the 95Z7 the strongest machine in its class.
 
 
Kawasaki Z7 Series Wheel Loader Innovations Extend to Operator Manuals - November 4, 2012 - Site-K Construction Zone - Online
http://www.site-kconstructionzone.com/?p=8470

You ask, "What can be innovative about an operator's manual?" Answer: "Wait until you see..."

Included in the package of materials given to the customer at the time of deliver is a manual called the Z7 Delivery Handbook, which contains all the information an operator needs to jump on the machine and start operating. The manual is 16-pages-of-machine-critical information; pictures, diagrams, illustrations, diagnostic trees, words and scan-able barcodes. If you don't have a barcode scanner on your smartphone simply go to the phone's app store and download ScanLife, a free app.

Once you have the app on your phone go to the book and scan any of 29 instructional barcodes that link you to YouTube videos covering such topics as: Parking Brake, Air Suspension Seat, Quick Power Button, Down Shift Switch, Ride Control Function, and any of the others. The length of the video varies depending on the subject covered. The video includes the appropriate audio.

The videos and dialogue are clear, easy to understand and appropriate the smartphone format. I was impressed and thought this was an excellent application for the use of a smartphone and digital technology. I guess the easiest way to find out is have a new Kawasaki Z7 Series wheel loader delivered to your jobsite. The company has 15 models from .78 to 13.5 cu yd - 45 HP to 720 HP.
 
 
Kawasaki Introduces New 95Z7 Wheel Loader - November 1, 2012 - Site-K Construction Zone - Online
http://www.site-kconstructionzone.com/?p=8446

When it comes to wheel loaders, Adam Weitsman, president of Upstate Shredding LLC - Ben Weitsman & Son Inc., headquarted in Owego, N.Y., knows from experience what works best for his scrap recycling company.

The company has grown in recent years, and now describes itself as the largest, privately owned scrap metal company in New York state.

KCMA Corporation, the marketer for Kawasaki wheel loaders in North America, recently introduced the all-new 95Z7 wheel loader. This machine is completely redesigned to meet all EPA Tier 4i emission standards as well as to improve operating efficiency and productivity. It is powered by 388 net horsepower diesel engine and equipped with a 7.3 cubic yard General Purpose bucket.

The most apparent change to the 95Z7 is the overall appearance. Striking new styling sets this machine apart. These styling changes are functional as well as aesthetic. The hood design improves rear visibility and serviceability.

The powertrain for the 95Z7 provides power and durability. The reliable and fuel efficient Isuzu 6WG1 diesel meets all Tier 4i emission standards with the use of Cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Diesel Particulate Filter or Exhaust Filter systems.

Engine access

This 16-liter engine is the largest in the class, providing excellent reserve capacity. The big planetary automatic-shift transmission has automotive-style smooth shifting from pulse width modulation in the control valve. This transmission also has standard Lock-up Torque Converter to improve fuel economy and performance. Plus the 95Z7 has standard Traction Control and Torque Proportioning Differentials to reduce wheel spin and extend tire life. The service brakes are mid-mounted for high capacity and cool operation and the final drives are outboard mounted for easy access.

The totally redesigned hydraulic system uses reliable, high performance Kawasaki variable displacement piston pumps that improve fuel efficiency. The operator station is roomy and provides excellent visibility, controllability and comfort to optimize productivity.

Like all Kawasaki Z7 series loaders, the 95Z7 has many new features to allow the machine to be operated at peak efficiency in a wide range of applications. Many intelligent features use inputs from the machine to adjust performance to match the conditions. Other features allow the operator to make adjustments to fit his requirements for production or comfort.

Battery box - easy access

Diagnostic systems have been improved to allow for more detailed data access to troubleshoot issues quickly and accurately. Serviceability is improved with easy access to the engine, cooling system cores, and filters. Oil change intervals have been increased for the engine and hydraulic systems to reduce overall operating costs. Cooling fan efficiency is improved with aerodynamic designs to improve air flow and cooling efficiency.

Not only did the Kawasaki 95Z7 introduce many new features, but it retained several of the heavy duty structural features that it has become famous for. Things like Dual Z-Linkage, Box Section Frames, Base Mounted Boom Cylinders and Heavy Duty Center Pin designs make the 95Z7 the strongest machine in its class.

This machine is ideal for loading customer trucks in a quarry, handling hot slag in a steel mill, carrying big log loads in a millyard, or handling any tough jobs a wheel loader is required to do.

The 95Z7 is the flagship of the Kawasaki family of wheel loaders.Kawasaki is the oldest ongoing manufacturer of rubber-tired, articulated, wheel loaders in the world, serving North America for over 30 years through its extensive, independent dealer network. For information on the 95Z7 wheel loader, and all other Z7 Kawasaki wheel loaders visit www.kawasakiloaders.com/95Z7.
 
 
Material Handling Equipment Focus - November 1, 2012 - Recycling Today - Online/Print
"Rolling Lifts" - Lisa McKenna

http://www.recyclingtoday.com/rt1112-wheel-loaders-scrap-recycling.aspx

When it comes to wheel loaders, Adam Weitsman, president of Upstate Shredding LLC - Ben Weitsman & Son Inc., headquarted in Owego, N.Y., knows from experience what works best for his scrap recycling company.

The company has grown in recent years, and now describes itself as the largest, privately owned scrap metal company in New York state.

Today Upstate operates 11 scrap metal recycling facilities in New York and Pennsylvania, including a new 18-acre port facility, export terminal and full-service scrap business in Albany, N.Y., that is expected to open in May of 2013.

Upstate also runs a multimillion-dollar, 10,000-horsepower mega shredder in Owego. The company expects to process more than 1 million tons of ferrous scrap and 200 million pounds of nonferrous scrap in 2013.

According to the company's website, over the last three years Upstate has expanded its operations, doubled its sales and has continued to grow vigorously based on strong customer service, quick turn-around time and promptly paying top prices for scrap metals.

The new Port Albany facility, located two hours away from the company's headquarters location, provides Upstate Shredding with direct access to the Upper Hudson River. The company has reported that the location is ideal because it will allow it direct access to international markets. The company also will be able to purchase scrap from other scrap yards in the five-state region and to ship material to domestic sources using the two railroad lines that serve the yard.

Upstate Shredding LLC - Ben Weitsman also has announced plans to build a $6 million wire chopping facility in Owego, along with a 100,000-square-foot nonferrous warehouse.

One of the company's recent business and operations decisions when it comes to moving scrap materials was switching to the use of all Kawasaki wheel loaders, a change that was made within the past few years. Weitsman points to a number of reasons for this business decision, with service and pricing being two key factors.

Equipment basics

Kawasaki Construction Machinery Corp. of America (KCMA), based in Kennesaw, Ga., which manufacturers Kawasaki wheel loaders (www.kawasakiloaders.com/recycling), describes itself as one of the oldest ongoing manufacturers of rubber-tire, articulated wheel loaders. The company says it has served the North American market for more than 30 years.

One way KCMA has focused on the scrap recycling industry is by offering a recycling package on its wheel loaders, designed for all types of recyclable materials, the company says. The recycling package includes special guarding, tires and attachments and is available on Kawasaki wheel loaders from the 65Z through the 115Z, says Gary Bell, KCMA vice president and general manager.

Bell says KCMA views the scrap market in two different ways. "There are the small auto salvage yards that use our 65ZV-2 and 70ZV-2 to handle cars," says Bell. "Then there are the major scrap handlers that require large machines," he continues, "such as our 90Z7, 92Z7, 95Z7 or even the 115Z7."

According to KCMA, the basic wheel loader recycling package features include numerous guards, such as the articulation area guard, axle brake piping guards, front and rear chassis belly guards and headlight and taillight guards. Additional available options include an auto-lube system, a hinged cab windshield guard, hydraulic and fuel tank guards and high lift arms.

Bell says components added as part of the recycling package can vary depending on the nature of the site. "Solid tires are very common to avoid tire punctures," he says. Meanwhile, the guarding varies depending on the customer. "We often use front and rear belly guards to protect the underside of the machine and try to prevent material from being caught in the drivelines," he says.

Also, with machines with outboard final drives (such as the 95 and 115), wheel seal guards also may be needed, Bell says.

Windshield guards are another common add-on among recyclers.

"Some customers like a flexible guard in the articulation area to keep debris from entering through this open area in the middle of the machine," notes Bell.

The company also offers guards for lights, tilt cylinder rods, radiator grilles, tanks and brake lines.

"The main purpose of these guards is to protect the machine from damage, so we let the customer decide which ones to select for his specific application and budget," Bell says.

Even more options for recycling customers include cab pressurizers to keep the dust down inside the cab, special precleaners for air filters and even finer screening in the engine venting area to keep debris out of the engine compartment, according to the company.

Operational factors

Weitsman says Upstate Shredding now runs about a dozen Kawasaki 115ZV-2 wheel loaders across its 10 East Coast locations, and has ordered six more Kawasaki wheel loaders for the company's newest Albany location.

Upstate Shredding LLC - Ben Weitsman & Son uses about one dozen Kawasaki 115ZV-2 wheel loaders.

Weitsman says the wheel loaders are used for generally the same purpose across all of the company's locations: pushing scrap to the shredder and for loading rail cars and the company's downstream systems with scrap metal.

As would be expected, Upstate's wheel loaders are equipped with the Kawasaki recycling package, which includes solid rubber tires, to prevent flat tires, and extensive protective guarding.

"The guarding makes it very safe for the operator, and that's the most important thing," notes Weitsman.

Upstate's wheel loaders also are equipped with bucket scales to weigh material as it's being loaded into rail cars and trucks, Weitsman says.

The company selected Kawasaki wheel loaders, Weitsman says, based on their competitive pricing, the favorable lead time when ordering and the fact that the loaders are serviced locally. Upstate is served by Kawasaki dealer Tracey Road Equipment in East Syracuse, N.Y.

Weitsman says in addition to the pricing and service benefits, the company's operators like the ease of use that is typical of the loaders. "They just think they're comfortable, they're easy to use," says Weitsman. And, he adds, the loaders have a comfortable ride.

The company switched to Kawasaki wheel loaders about three years ago, Weitsman says, for a few reasons, with a main factor being the service availability of the local dealer. "The support of the local dealer is very important to us, because our facilities here run 24 hours a day, seven days a week," says Weitsman, who adds that downtime is tracked carefully at Upstate's yards.

Weitsman says Tracey Road Equipment has been responsive to service calls from the company. "If we need them, they're out here fast," he continues. "They're out here on weekends, they're out here at night."

With the company continuing on its growth curve and adding additional locations, fast response time is a priority for Upstate Shredding. "We felt they took our business seriously," Weitsman says of Tracey Road Equipment.

Next generation

Upstate Shredding's newest wheel loaders, which are on order currently, are six additional loaders from Kawasaki's new Z7 Tier 4i wheel loader series.

KCMA Corp. had introduced the first models of its new Kawasaki Z7 line of wheel loaders earlier this year. The redesign included styling changes designed to be functional as well as attractive, Kawasaki reports, and are targeted at improving both visibility and serviceability.

The first two models Kawasaki introduced were the 85Z7 and the 90Z7, offering 221 and 280 net horsepower respectively. The 85Z7 features a 4.8-cubic-yard general-purpose bucket, while the 90Z7 can accommodate a 5.5-cubic-yard general-purpose bucket or a 6.1-cubic-yard material-handling bucket.

The company has reported that it designed the new machines to meet EPA Tier 4i emission standards, with the inclusion of diesel particulate filters, exhaust gas recirculation systems, variable geometry turbochargers and high pressure common rail fuel systems.

"We totally redesigned the Z7s from the ground up," says Bell. "Our machines have always been very reliable and productive, but now we have added a lot more operator features and operating cost lowering capacity."

According to KCMA, the features built into its new wheel loader models are designed to reduce operating costs and increase production. For example, HN bushings used in the linkage system extend grease intervals to 500 hours, the company says.

The models also feature KCMA's IntelliTech operating system, designed to improve operating efficiency with custom operating power modes.

However, the company says operators will first notice improvements with regard to the operator station on the new Z7 wheel loaders. Changes were made to improve visibility, controls, sound and ventilation. A rear camera, included as standard on Z7 models, helps prevent blind spots, and the heated air ride seat also is designed to improve operator comfort. According to KCMA, the IntelliTech system captures aspects of working conditions and operating demands to adjust the power train and hydraulics for best application requirements.

Also included as standard is the wide fin radiator with an automatic reversible fan. And the company says the line's sophisticated dashboard monitor provides a wide range of operating data along with the ability to adjust systems. The new Z7 operator compartment features a low-profile dash, full length glass doors, panoramic front window and standard rearview camera.

Guarding options are similar to previous models and include the articulation area guard, front and rear chassis belly guards, wheel seal guards, light housing guards and steel radiator grill.

Meanwhile, Upstate's Weitsman says he looks forward to receiving his company's new Kawaskai wheel loaders in the coming months. "I'm just looking to up my production," he adds.
 
 
Styling changes improve functionality - November 2012 - Pit and Quarry - Online/Print
http://editiondigital.net/publication/?i=131944

The first two models of Kawasaki's Z7 wheel loader generation, the 85Z7 and 90Z7, meet Tier 4i emission standards. New powertrain components, hydraulic and electrical systems and structures were developed to improve efficiency, productivity and comfort. Many features use sophisticated controls and logic to provide more intelligent systems that adjust to the working conditions of the machine to improve efficiency. The most apparent change in the Z7 wheel loaders is the appearance, according to Kawasaki. The styling changes are designed to be functional as well as attractive by improving visibility and serviceability. McCann Construction, based out of Stratford, Ontario, hosted a pit party at their south Stratford, 130-acre sand and gravel pit on September 26.
 
 
Kawasaki Introduces New 95Z7 Wheel Loader - October 31, 2012 - Construction Equipment Guide - Online
http://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/Kawasaki-Introduces-New-95Z7-Wheel-Loader/19171/

KCMA Corporation, the marketer for Kawasaki wheel loaders in North America, is proud to announce the all new 95Z7 wheel loader. This outstanding machine is completely redesigned to meet all EPA Tier 4i emission standards as well as to improve operating efficiency and productivity. At 388 net horsepower and equipped with a 7.3 cubic yard General Purpose bucket, this production class loader is a pace setter in the industry.

The most apparent change to the 95Z7 is the overall appearance. Striking new styling sets this machine apart from the crowd. These styling changes are functional as well as aesthetic. The hood design improves rear visibility and serviceability.

The powertrain for the 95Z7 provides power and durability. The reliable and fuel efficient Isuzu 6WG1 diesel meets all Tier 4i emission standards with the use of Cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Diesel Particulate Filter or Exhaust Filter systems. This 16 liter engine is the largest in the class, providing excellent reserve capacity. The big planetary automatic-shift transmission has automotive-style smooth shifting from pulse width modulation in the control valve. This transmission also has standard Lock-up Torque Converter to improve fuel economy and performance. Plus the 95Z7 has standard Traction Control and Torque Proportioning Differentials to reduce wheel spin and extend tire life. The service brakes are mid-mounted for high capacity and cool operation and the final drives are outboard mounted for easy access.

The totally redesigned hydraulic system uses reliable, high performance Kawasaki variable displacement piston pumps that improve fuel efficiency. The operator station is roomy and provides excellent visibility, controllability and comfort to optimize productivity.

Like all Kawasaki Z7 series loaders, the 95Z7 has many new features to allow the machine to be operated at peak efficiency in a wide range of applications. Many intelligent features use inputs from the machine to adjust performance to match the conditions. Other features allow the operator to make adjustments to fit his requirements for production or comfort.

Diagnostic systems have been improved to allow for more detailed data access to troubleshoot issues quickly and accurately. Serviceability is improved with easy access to the engine, cooling system cores, and filters. Oil change intervals have been increased for the engine and hydraulic systems to reduce overall operating costs. Cooling fan efficiency is improved with aerodynamic designs to improve air flow and cooling efficiency.

Not only did the Kawasaki 95Z7 introduce many new features, but it retained several of the heavy duty structural features that it has become famous for. Things like Dual Z-Linkage, Box Section Frames, Base Mounted Boom Cylinders and Heavy Duty Center Pin designs make the 95Z7 the strongest machine in its class.

This machine is ideal for loading customer trucks in a quarry, handling hot slag in a steel mill, carrying big log loads in a millyard, or handling any tough jobs a wheel loader is required to do. The 95Z7 is the flagship of the Kawasaki family of wheel loaders.

Kawasaki is the oldest ongoing manufacturer of rubber-tired, articulated, wheel loaders in the world, serving North America for over 30 years through its extensive, independent dealer network. For information on the 95Z7 wheel loader, and all other Z7 Kawasaki wheel loaders visit www.kawasakiloaders.com/95Z7.
 
 
Kawasaki 95Z7 - October 29, 2012 - Equipment Today - Online
http://www.forconstructionpros.com/product/10821902/kcma-corporation-kawasaki-95z7

Kawasaki completely redesigns 95Z7 Wheel loader with new styling and enhanced performance.

The Kawasaki 95Z7 has been completely redesigned to meet all EPA Tier 4i emission standards as well as to improve operating efficiency and productivity.
 •  Hood design improves rear visibility and serviceability  
 •  388 net horsepower and equipped with a 7.3 cubic yard General Purpose bucket  
 •  16-liter Isuzu 6WG1 diesel meets Tier 4i emission standards with the use of Cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Diesel Particulate Filter or Exhaust Filter systems  
 •  Big planetary automatic-shift transmission has automotive-style smooth shifting from pulse width modulation in the control valve  
 •  Standard lock-up torque converter to improve fuel economy and performance  
 •  Standard traction control and torque proportioning differentials to reduce wheel spin and extend tire life  
 •  Hydraulic system uses reliable, high performance Kawasaki variable displacement piston pumps  
 
 
Great Lakes New Holland Showcases Kawasaki 90Z7 and 92ZV-2 at Ontario Sand and Gravel Pit - October 22, 2012 - Equipment Journal - Print
http://www.equipmentjournal.com/eNews/2012/issue14/34.html

McCann Construction, based out of Stratford, Ontario, hosted a pit party at their south Stratford, 130-acre sand and gravel pit on September 26.

The event was organized by Great Lakes New Holland (GLNH) in order to showcase the Kawasaki 92ZV-2 and 90Z7 wheel loaders.

Contractors from several companies showed up to demo the machines.

"The machines are really well balanced, both from side to side and from front to back," says Mike Wilhelm from Wilhelm Excavating. "It has a beautiful cab, strong engine power, and great access to the engine."

Great Lakes New Holland is a new and used equipment dealer with four Ontario locations: Mitchell, St. Marys. St. Thomas, and Tavistock.

Kawasaki is the most experienced manufacturer of articulated wheel loaders in the world; the company introduced their first wheel loader models in 1962. Backed by the massive resources of Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Kawasaki Construction Machinery's focus on wheel loaders translates into real benefits for contractors and businesses.

Kawasaki articulated wheel loaders incorporate innovative design features coupled with extensive knowledge and experience gained from real-world applications. Kawasaki pioneered ZLink design to provide unmatched utility, high breakout force, and efficiency in its machines.
 
 
CCS Equipment Partners With Kawasaki in Eastern N.C. - September 19, 2012 - Construction Equipment Guide - Online
http://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/CCS-Equipment-Partners-With-Kawasaki-in-Eastern-NC/18911/

It seems to be a partnership borne out of a mutual desire to give customers exactly what they need through friendly, honest service.

When CCS Equipment Sales LLC, a full service equipment dealership located just north of Raleigh, wanted to begin offering a bigger line of wheel loaders to give their utility company customers a fuller line of equipment, they zeroed in on Kawasaki, a manufacturer known for its well-made machines.

Coincidentally, Kawasaki also was looking for another dealer for its equipment in the lucrative eastern North Carolina market.

The result was that CCS Equipment and Kawasaki teamed up earlier this year to begin offering the Japanese maker's line of articulated wheel loaders in the eastern half of the Tarheel State.

Since the deal was finalized in the last few months, Charles Davis and Todd Snyder, the two partners who run CCS Equipment, have quoted several Kawasaki machines to some of their customers, as well as sold both a model 45ZV-2 and a 65TMV-2.

"We have been selling Takeuchi's line of small wheel loaders, but Kawasaki is the only line of big wheel loaders that we have," explained Snyder. "By carrying the Kawasaki brand it opens up the marketplace for us as far as the bigger machines for our utility customers and maybe, eventually, we will be able to sell to quarries."

CCS is a small dealership with about 15 employees, but since its founding 14 years ago it has been able to serve a wide range of clients both large and small.

In the current economy, though, Snyder said that in order to stay competitive, bold steps have to be taken.

"We have gotten our start working a great deal with owner-operators and utility guys," he added. "But bringing on Kawasaki just opens up another revenue stream for us and gives us more of a full line of equipment to offer these guys. We have never had a big wheel loader to offer before, but now we have something attractive for the utility companies, with whom we do a lot of business."

Snyder said that CCS Equipment also was drawn to Kawasaki due to its excellent reputation in making top-of-the-line wheel loaders.

"I think that we kind of fit the profile of somebody they were looking for - somebody that is sales- and service-oriented and, as it happened, we were looking for a product in that size," he added. "We were very fortunate to run into those guys and get a partnership going."

Humble Beginnings

CCS Equipment Sales was started in 1998 as an equipment brokerage firm by the trio of Charlie Snyder (Todd's father), Charles Davis and Steve Jefferies in a small, one-room office above an ice cream shop. The next year, the company moved to Youngsville, a small town in Franklin County just to the northeast of Raleigh.

Today, CCS Equipment is still at the Youngsville site on five acres along N.C. Highway 96.

Since that time, Jefferies and Charlie Snyder have both retired and Todd Snyder came aboard in 1999.

The company has moved from being a simple equipment broker to now offering a full line of services, including sales, rental and repair.

Besides moving Kawasaki wheel loaders and Takeuchi loaders and excavators, its new product line also includes Link-Belt excavators, Gehl skid steers, loaders, pavers, excavators and telehandlers, as well as Multi-Quip's lineup of construction machinery equipment (compaction, generators, welders, lighting solutions, dewatering equipment and concrete/masonry equipment).

However, according to Snyder, their bread-and-butter is the variety of used equipment they have for sale, especially CCS Equipment's inventory of excavators.

"In the last four or five years, the used equipment has been what has really sustained us and we have done a lot of overseas business in that time," he said. "Our parts business and rental business have been real strong for us, too."

Thriving in a Competitive Market

The core of the dealership's business, though, is eastern North Carolina, from Alamance County just west of the Triangle to points south and east.

"This is a very competitive marketplace and that starts with the big guys that sell Caterpillar and Komatsu, " Snyder explained. "But, as I said, we have had to be creative and we have learned that taking care of the owner/operators has always been the thing that has made us successful."

Snyder counts CCS Equipment's relatively small size as an asset in helping to nurture the company's important one-on-one relationships with its customers.

"Charles and I are around here all the time, so if answers are needed we can provide them pretty quickly," he said. "There are not a lot of people you have to go through to get an answer."

He added that there have been times when larger dealerships have dismissed CCS Equipment as just a little company that "may not be around long, but I think after surviving this economy it has been proven that we are to stay."
 
 
Machine Matters - August 02, 2012 - Equipment World - Online/Print
http://www.equipmentworld.com/machine-mattershttpwww-equipmentworld-comp36388previewtrue/?pg=3

The IntelliDig system on Kawasaki's new 85Z7 and 95Z7 balances rimpull and hydraulic force, metering out power, as the bucket moves into a pile.

http://www.equipmentworld.com/machine-mattershttpwww-equipmentworld-comp36388previewtrue/?pg=5

Kawasaki's new 85Z7 and 90Z7's new body designs improve visibility from the cab. Features include Tier 4 Interim engines, new powertrain components and hydraulic and electrical systems. An Isuzu engine provides the 85Z7 with 221 horsepower while the 90Z7 has a 280-horsepower Hino engine. Use of variable displacement piston pumps in an open-centered, excavator-style hydraulic system saves on fuel and improves the overall feel and response of the hydraulic system. The "IntelliDig" system balances rimpull power and breakout force when digging tough materials. Both models have a high degree of operator customization, allowing the operator to set power settings, lift arm kickout settings, the declutch setting and how the transmission shifts.
 
Product Report - Z7 Loaders Sport New Styling - July 1, 2012 - Equipment World - Online/Print
http://www.equipmentworld.com/product-report-28/

Kawasaki intros first two models of 15 machine lineup.

Shipments started this April on the first two models of Kawasaki's Z7 wheel loader lineup, the 85Z7 and the 90Z7. These will be joined by four additional Z7 machines by the end of this year, with an eventual 15 models in the line.

Kawasaki is adding a new building at its Newnan, Ga., plant to handle Z7 production, which replaces the ZV-2 series.

"The Z7 is a dramatically different machine," says Gary Bell, vice president-general manager, Kawasaki Construction Machinery Corp. of America, noting that both Kawasaki and Hitachi engineers worked on the machine as a joint venture that began in 2008. "Virtually every part is new." Immediately apparent is the series' new styling and all-new cab, offering enhanced visibility with full-length glass doors.

Both machines offer a standard package of previously optional equipment, including a forward/reverse switch, an integrated backup camera, a battery disconnect switch, turn signals with flashers, and lifting eyes. In addition, the 90Z7 has a standard lock-up torque converter and traction control. Limited slip differential will be standard on the 85Z7 models and under.

Kawasaki says the new line up offers lower operating costs and fuel-efficient variable displacement piston pumps. "Kawasaki is a leader in piston pumps in excavators (not sold in North America), but we've never used them in our loaders," Bell says. "They are much more fuel efficient, since they only use energy when the hydraulics are used, in comparison to gear pumps, which run all the time." Bell says the Z7's open-center/load-sensing hydraulics is an industry exclusive for loaders.

The Z7 interior offers four times the cab pressurization compared to the previous ZV-2 models. The standard rear camera can be operational all the time, only in reverse, or turned off. A sliding side console moves to fit operator preferences.

The Z7's IntelliTech systems help the operator adapt to working conditions and can be automatic or operator selected.

These systems include:
 •  The patented IntelliDig, which kicks into action as the bucket moves into a pile. "It balances rimpull and hydraulic force," Bell explains, "metering out power as the bucket comes through the pile and helping avoid a situation where the hydraulics are overpowered."  
 •  Simul-Load, which gives operators the ability to both tilt the bucket and raise the loader arms simultaneously while digging, then go to tilt-priority control in the upper range of the lift. Operators can set when in the lift they want the system to switch over to tilt-priority.  
 •  Quick Cycle, used when approaching a truck or dump site with a raised loaded bucket, does not allow a second-to-third gear upshift "until the boom is fully in range," Bell says.  

A quick power-mode button, located on the side of the left control lever, gives operators a power boost for hill climbing, digging into a pile, or whenever additional rim pull is needed. The machine will stay in the power mode until a transmission change.

Two down-shift buttons, located at the top and side of the right control lever, allow down shifting one gear for added rimpull. And a shift-hold button holds the transmission in gear when needed.

Kawasaki says it's the only loader manufacturer to offer HN bushings, which come from the Hitachi side of the machine development. Every time the pin is greased, the lubricant is replenished. During operation, oil oozes from the pores of the bushing into the clearance between pins and bushing, providing lubrication and extending the lube interval to 500 hours. Hydraulic and engine oil intervals have been doubled from previous models: 4,000 hours on hydraulic oil when using KCM SuperEX46 oil, and 500 hours when using the CJ-4 low-ash engine oil, required on Tier 4 engines.

Kawasaki Snapshot
 •  First articulated wheel loader manufactured in 1962.  
 •  First Japanese-branded wheel loader, the ZII, introduced to the United States in 1978.  
 •  Newnan, Ga., assembly facility operational since 1988.  
 •  Development joint venture with Hitachi began in 2008.  
 •  80-plus North American dealers.  
 •  15,000-plus retailed loaders in North America.  
 
 
Firm Redesigns Wheel Loaders - July/August 2012 - Scrap - Print
KCMA Corp. has introduced the 85Z7 and 90Z7, the first two models of the Kawasaki Z7 wheel-loader line, which it redesigned to improve the machines' efficiency, productivity, emissions, and comfort, the company says. A 221-hp Isuzu engine powers the 85Z7, which comes with a 4.8-cubic-yard general-purpose bucket, while the 90Z7 has a 280-hp Hino Diesel engine and can accommodate a 5.5-cubic-yard general-purpose bucket or a 6.1-cubic-yard material-handling bucket. The loaders feature Kawasaki's IntelliTech operating system, which automatically adjusts their operating characteristics to maximize performance while still allowing the operator to select custom operating power modes. HN bushings in each loader's linkage system extend greasing intervals to 500 hours, and the use of KCM EX46 hydraulic oil doubles the oil-change interval to 4,000 hours, Kawasaki says. The units meet Tier 4i emission standards thanks to their diesel particulate filters, exhaust gas recirculation systems, variable geometry turbochargers, and high-pressure common rail fuel systems, the company says. Previous options such as a backup camera and wide-fin radiator with automatic reversible fan now come standard on the Z7 line. For the operator, the loaders offer better visibility, less noise, improved ventilation, easier controls, and a "sophisticated" dash monitor that provides a range of operating data, the firm says. "We've been satisfied with the Kawasakis so far," concludes Elliott. "They are good loaders."
 
 
Loaders deliver power and versatility needed by aggregates producer - June 2012 - Heavy Equipment Guide - Print
The Sarjeant Company has been a familiar name for well over 100 years in the Lake Simcoe area of Ontario, just north of Toronto. Today, it specializes in concrete, asphalt and aggregates, while supplying other products and services to residents and businesses. They are even involved in the Detour Lake Project gold mine. A sister company, Custom Concrete (Northern), is a major supplier of aggregates, concrete block and ready-mix concrete - including portable concrete lab services and crushing operations.

Like so many crushing operations, the Sarjeant Company relies heavily on its wheel loaders. So when it came time to purchase a new loader, Doug Kelly, Operations Manager, and Scott Elliott, President and CEO of Sarjeant and Custom Concrete (Northern), explored their options.

"We've had a great relationship with McDowell Equipment for quite some time now," explains Elliott. "As they are the local Kawasaki dealer, we certainly were aware of the brand. We were also familiar with Kawasaki as some other local companies were using them, and we'd heard good reports. The brand was also touted as having lower operating costs. And we like that they used Cummins engines - that was good for us."

"We decided to try Kawasaki because we felt it would lower our operating costs," says Kelly. "As it turns out, they actually dig hard. There is no jockeying when they go into the bank. And it fills the bucket without a problem. Our operators like them."

Pit Number 3 is now home to two Kawasaki 95ZV-2s. One has a general bucket, the other a spade-nose bucket. Sarjeant also chose to equip them with the ride control and autolube.

On the job since Spring 2011, the wheel loaders have been under the watchful eye of Adam Toffan, Pit Number 3's operations superintendent. "Production is key," says Toffan, "and they have unbelievable power. I can't believe the power they have. And they are versatile. They've got more power and torque than any other loader I've drive. And the speed of the hydraulics is much better than the others."

Seventy-five percent of the company's gravel sales are in-house. The rest is sold to whomever wants it, whether that's private homeowners, the government, contractors, big construction companies, or road builders. In the winter, sand is purchased by counties and municipalities for winter road maintenance.

The Kawasakis attack stockpiles and load a wide variety of trucks, tractor-trailers, pups, and tri-axles as well as hoppers and screens. Although -20 below can wreak havoc on trailers, Sarjeant is not expecting any cold-weather related problems with their Kawasakis.

"We've been satisfied with the Kawasakis so far," concludes Elliott. "They are good loaders."
 
 
What's Your Best Bet To Get The Load Out - May 16, 2012 - Equipment Today - Online
http://www.forconstructionpros.com/article/10705338/whats-your-best-bet-to-get-the-load-out

Wheel loader size and setup for efficient load out are a balancing act between production and versatility.

Depending upon your operation, trade-offs may exist in selecting the best wheel loader configuration for load-out vs. performing other tasks on your construction sites. Typically, three to four passes is the most efficient match to load on-road trucks.

Balancing the loader to the frequency of trucks is really where you gain efficiency. "Whatever the number of passes, if you load a truck as another one shows up, you are at optimum efficiency," says Gary Bell, vice president/general manager, KCMA Corporation, manufacturer of Kawasaki wheel loaders.

Choose Buckets Wisely

Be cautious about the true limitations of bucket size relative to material density and wheel loader capacity. Some customers try to gain an advantage by using a larger bucket. Bell has witnessed this firsthand over 45 years in the industry. "If they had a 3-yd. loader, they wanted to make it a 3 1/2-yd. loader somehow," he comments. "If they had a 4 yd., they wanted to make it a 4 1/2 yd. People are always trying to push these machines beyond their capability."

Overloading a machine accelerates wear. "If you sell a smaller machine to do the same work, you can sell a customer a lower cost per ton, at least in the purchase price and probably most of the operating cost," says Bell. "But if you ask a machine to take 20% more, it will probably last 20% less overall. It does not make sense that you can do 20% more work and not wear the machine out more quickly."
 
 
Kawasaki Introduces Z7 Wheel Loaders - May 14, 2012 - Recycling Today / Construction & Demolition Recycling - Online
http://www.cdrecycler.com/Article.aspx?article_id=128370

http://www.recyclingtoday.com/kawasaki-wheel-loader-kmca.aspx

KCMA Corp., a Kennesaw, Ga.-based marketer of Kawasaki wheel loaders, has released the first two models of the Kawasaki Z7 Wheel Loader generation: the 85Z7 and 90Z7. The company says it designed the new machines to meet EPA Tier 4i emission standards required by introducing new systems like diesel particulate filters, exhaust gas recirculation systems, variable geometry turbochargers and high pressure common rail fuel systems. Kawasaki says new power train components, hydraulic and electrical systems and structures were developed to improve efficiency, productivity and comfort. The first two models of the 85Z7 are the 221 net hp wheel loader powered by an Isuzu engine. With a4.8 cubic yard general purpose bucket, the wheel loader is bigger than its predecessor and has 280 net hp from its Hino diesel engine. The general purpose bucket is 5.5 cubic yards, and the material handling bucket is 6.1 cubic yards.

The features of the Kawasaki Z7 wheel loaders are designed to reduce operating costs and increase production. The HN bushings used in the linkage system extend grease intervals to 500 hours. Use of KCM EX46 hydraulic oil will allow for oil change intervals in the hydraulic system to be doubled to 4,000 hours, according to the company.

Gary Bell, vice president and general manager, says, "We have worked closely with customers in this demanding application and developed options that make Kawasaki wheel loaders a very productive, safe and economic machine to operate in this severe environment."
 
 
Kawasaki's Z7 wheel loaders for recycling - May/June 2012 - Recycling Product News - Online/Print
http://rpn.baumpub.com/products/12128/kawasakis-z7-wheel-loaders-for-recycling

The most apparent change in Kawasaki's new Z7 wheel loaders is the appearance. The model's styling changes include improved visibility and serviceability. The first two models of Kawasaki Z7 wheel loaders are the 85Z7 and 90Z7.

The 85Z7 is a strong 221 net horsepower wheel loader powered by an Isuzu engine. With a 4.8-cubic- yard general purpose bucket, the 90Z7 wheel loader is bigger than its predecessor and packs 280 net horsepower using a Hino engine.

According to Kawasaki, they have been a strong performer in the Scrap and recycling industry for many years. Now, with their latest models, previously optional equipment, including a backup camera, is now standard, as is a wide fin radiator with automatic reversible fan. Plus, with guarding options such as an articulation area guard, front and rear chassis belly guards, and wheel seal guards, vital areas of the loader are well protected.

Additional options include steel light housings with protective guards, a steel radiator grill, quick coupler and 3rd-spool hydraulics, autolube system, windshield guard, limited slip differentials, and ride control.
 
 
Specs - Wheel Loaders (Standard Lift) - Heavy Equipment Guide - May 2012 - Print
Kawasaki's new generation of Z7 wheel loaders has been totally redesigned from the ground up. Sophisticated controls provide "intelligent" systems which adjust to the working conditions of the machine to improve efficiency. Use of variable displacement piston pumps in an open-centered, excavator style hydraulic system saves on fuel and improves overall feel and response of the hydraulic system. The patented "IntelliDig" system balances rimpull piwer and breakout force to speed cycles when digging tough materials.
 
 
Kawasaki Overhauls Wheel Loader Line - April 19, 2012 - Construction Equipment - Online/Print
http://www.constructionequipment.com/kawasaki-overhauls-wheel-loader-line

80Z7 and 90Z7 are the first in the redesigned Z7 series that incorporates Tier 4-Interim engines. Kawasaki has also added several standard features to boost value and benefits.

Kawasaki has introduced the first two models in its redesigned Z7 Series wheel loaders: the 85Z7 and 90Z7. This is Kawasaki's first series upgrade since 2006, and it centers on the integration of Tier 4-Interim engines. Kawasaki, as have other manufacturers, implemented substantial design changes that touched everything except the tires, according to Gary Bell, VP and general manager of Kawasaki Construction Machinery Corp. of America (KCMA), which assembles and markets the machines in North America.

Tier 4-Interim diesels sparked the redesigns, and KCMA will use Cummins, Hino and Isuzu engines in the 7-model lineup. 85Z7 uses a 221-horsepower Isuzu diesel; the 90Z7 a 280-horsepower Hino powerplant.

Many optional features from the 2006 series have been made standard, says Bell, because they are "performance- and convenience-related."

"Making optional equipment standard cuts [manufacturing] costs and adds value," he says. KCMA will absorb much of the research and development costs incurred to redesign the loaders for the new engines and mostly offset cost increases with the additional standard equipment.

Kawasaki will market Z7 Series features around four 'benefit classes', defined as Efficient, Productive, Intelligent, Comfortable (EPIC).

The loaders use hydraulic piston pumps for fuel-efficiency, instead of gear pumps. Automode transmission allows the operator to select the shift mode that best fits the application. Kawasaki has doubled engine and hydraulic service hours to 500 hours and 4,000 hours, respectively. An HN bushing increase lube intervals to 500 hours. Lubricant in the bushing is replenished every time the pin is greased, then lubricant slowly escapes to extend the interval.

Excavator-style open center/load sensing hydraulics provide better feel and are more responsive than closed center systems, Bell says.

The loader line incorporates intelligent systems that adjust to working conditions in order to improve overall efficiency and production. Included is a patented Intellidig feature that balances rimpull and breakforce with digging into material such as shot rock. Simul-Load provides simultaneous control for tilt and raise during loading, then switches to tilt priority for the dump cycle.

Sounds levels have been reduced to a range of 72 to 74 dB(A) in the cab and 106 dB(A) outside. To help adjust for the larger engine compartment needed to accommodate the additional emissions hardware, Kawasaki tapered the hood on the sides to improve visibility. A rear camera is now standard, too, and provides excellent visibility in the blind spot directly behind the machine.

Four more models will be available by the end of the year. Bell says more than 80 dealers now represent Kawasaki in North America.
 
 
Kawasaki Introduces New Z7 Wheel Loaders - April 18, 2012 - Construction Equipment Guide - Online
http://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/Kawasaki-Introduces-New-Z7-Wheel-Loaders/18044/

KCMA Corporation, the North American marketers of Kawasaki wheel loaders, is releasing first two models of the Kawasaki Z7 wheel loader generation. These machines are totally redesigned from the ground up, meeting EPA Tier IVi emission standards required introduction of new systems like diesel particulate filters, exhaust gas recirculation systems, variable geometry turbochargers and high pressure common rail fuel systems. But Kawasaki didn't stop there. New powertrain components, hydraulic and electrical systems, and structures were developed to improve efficiency, productivity and comfort. Many features use sophisticated controls and logic to provide "intelligent" systems that adjust to the working conditions of the machine to improve efficiency, according to the manufacturer.

The most apparent change in the Kawasaki Z7 wheel loaders is the appearance. New styling sets these machines off. The styling changes are functional as well as attractive, by improving visibility and serviceability.

The first two models of the Kawasaki Z7 wheel loaders are the 85Z7 and 90Z7. The 85Z7 is a strong 221 net hp (165 kW) wheel loader powered by an Isuzu engine. With a 4.8 cu. yd. (3.7 cu m) general purpose bucket, the 85Z7 is ideal for a wide range of applications from plant loading, construction, stockpile loadout or other general loader applications. Equipped with special application modifications the 85Z7 also will be used in logging, refuse, scrap and chemical applications.

The Kawasaki 90Z7 wheel loader is bigger than its predecessor and packs a big 280 net hp (209 kW) from a fuel stingy Hino diesel engine. The general purpose bucket is 5.5 cu. yds. (4.2 cu m) and the material handling bucket is 6.1 cu. yds. (4.7 cu m). This is an ideal machine for stockpile loading, plant applications, and a variety of other general loader applications. It also will have the flexibility of being sold in special applications such as hot slag, refuse and logging.

The features of the new Kawasaki Z7 wheel loaders are aimed at reducing operating costs and increasing production. Innovative designs like the HN bushings used in the linkage system extend grease intervals to 500 hours. Use of KCM EX46 hydraulic oil will allow for oil change intervals in the hydraulic system to be doubled to 4,000 hours. Use of variable displacement piston pumps in an open-centered, excavator style hydraulic system saves on fuel and improves overall feel and response of the hydraulic system. The "IntelliDig" system balances rimpull power and breakout force when digging tough materials to speed cycles. The operator can set a variety of items to allow the machine to fit his production needs. He can set power settings, lift arm kickout settings, declutch setting and even the way the transmission shifts to fit his application.

But operators will be most impressed with the total redesign of the operator station on the new Kawasaki Z7 wheel loaders. A rear camera ensures that the operator can back up without blind spots to the rear. The air ride seat can be heated to provide comfort in cold climates. The sophisticated dash monitor provides a wide range of operating data as well as the ability to adjust systems and provide fuel economy data on request.
 
 
Introducing The New Kawasaki Z7 Series Wheel Loaders - April 5, 2012 - Tracey Road Equipment - Online
http://www.traceyroad.com/this-weeks-dirt-blog/?Tag=90Z7

Kawasaki has just released the first two newly redesigned Z7 Series wheel loaders, the 85Z7 and the 90Z7. The 85Z7 weights in at 45,560 lbs. and is powered by a 221 net hp. Isuzu diesel engine and the 90Z7 weighs in at 54,3700 lbs. and is powered by a 280 net hp. Hino diesel engine. Both of these loaders meet Tier 4 emissions standards using diesel particulate filters, high pressure common rail fuel injection, variable geometry turbocharger and exhaust gas recirculation. The Z7 series line of loaders are efficient, productive, intelligent, and comfortable.

  Efficient:    
   •  Lower operating costs.  
   •  More energy efficient.  
   •  Better fuel economy.  
   •  Open-Center, load-sensing hydraulics (Industry Exclusive).  
  Productive:    
   •  More power, speed and capacity.  
   •  Easy loading bucket with longer floor.  
   •  Equipped with Intellidig which offers balanced hydraulic and rimpull power for more efficient digging.  
  Intelligent: (Intellitech)    
   •  Logical/intelligent system that adapts to working conditions and is automatic or operator controlled.  
   •  Simuload - Allows you to lift and tilt simultaneously.  
   •  Auto Idle Shutdown - Reduce fuel loss from excess idling.  
  Cab Features:    
   •  Improved visibility with rear camera, low profile dash and tapered hood.  
   •  Improved comfort with more leg room, tilt wheel, adjustable side console and heated seat (optional).  
   •  Improved convenience- storage, coat hook, radio, sweep out floor.  
   •  Reduced sound levels- Fan insulation, sealing of cab.  
  Serviceability:    
   •  Large Compartment doors that swing out for better access.  
   •  Swing up radiator guard and swing out radiator.  
   •  Grouped grease fittings, ground level fuel access, sight guages for hydraulics.  
   •  Extended engine and hydraulic oil change intervals.  
 
Video Posts - March 29, 2012 - Equipment Today - Online
http://www.forconstructionpros.com/video/10685099/kawasaki-z7-short-intro

http://www.forconstructionpros.com/video/10685092/kawasaki-z7-wheel-loaders
 
 
Kawasaki 85Z7 and 90Z7 Wheel Loaders - March 29, 2012 - Equipment Today - Online
http://www.forconstructionpros.com/product/10684636/kcma-corporation-kawasaki-85z7-and-90z7-wheel-loaders

Kawasaki Z7 loaders feature a completely new look and intelligent functions
 •  The 45,560-lb. 85Z7 is powered by a 221-net-hp Isuzu diesel engine, while the 54,370-lb. 90Z7 features a 280-net-hp Hino diesel engine.
 •  Variable-displacement piston pumps in an open-centered, excavator-style hydraulic system save fuel and improve overall feel and response
 •  "IntelliDig" system balances rimpull power and breakout force when digging tough materials to speed cycles
 •  Breakout forces of 34,870 and 44,060 lbs.
 •  4.1- to 5.2-cu.-yd. (85Z7) and 5.1- to 6.1-cu.-yd. (90Z7) buckets
 •  Totally redesigned operator station
 
 
Kawasaki Takes Slick New Approach with Z7 Wheel Loaders - March 29, 2012 - Equipment Today - Online/Print
http://www.forconstructionpros.com/article/10684702/kawasaki-takes-slick-new-approach-with-z7-wheel-loaders

KCMA releases the first two models in what promises to be a sleek, feature-rich loader lineup.

With a 33-year history in the U.S., KCMA, the North American marketer of Kawasaki wheel loaders, is preparing to release the first two models of the Kawasaki Z7 wheel loader generation. The 85Z7 and 90Z7 will begin shipments in April; four additional models are scheduled for release by the end of the year.

The new loaders represent a significant departure from Kawasaki's traditional styling. Since the 1980s, the company has based its loaders on the same structural design. The sleeker, "sexier" lines of the new models provide a more modern appearance, while improving both visibility and serviceability around the machine.

"The Z7 we have today is a dramatically different machine," says Gary Bell, vice president - general manager. "Almost everything on it is new."

Overall Systems Upgrade

The 45,560-lb. 85Z7 is equipped with a 221-net-hp Isuzu engine and has a 4.1 to 5.2-cu.-yd. bucket capacity, 34,870-lb. breakout force and 31,330-lb. full turn tipping load. The 54,370-lb.90Z7 is fitted with a beefier 280-net-hp Hino diesel engine and offers a 5.1- to 6.1-cu.-yd. bucket capacity, 44,060-lb. breakout force and 36,070-lb. full turn tipping load.

The Z7 engines will meet Tier 4 Interim (T4i) emission standards using systems such as diesel particulate filters, exhaust gas recirculation, variable geometry turbochargers and high-pressure common rail fuel systems.The redesigned cooling system with advanced reversible cooling fan reduces noise and increases cooling efficiency. The lighter composite material and aerodynamic shape of the fan blades allows the blades to spin faster and reduces the horsepower required to run the fan, reducing fuel consumption.

Like many suppliers, Kawasaki took advantage of the Tier 4i transition to redesign a number of other machine systems. New powertrain components, hydraulic and electrical systems and structures were developed to further enhance performance and fuel efficiency. Load-sensing automatic transmissions include a mode selection function, declutch and down-shift button.

Gear pumps have been replaced by variable displacement piston pumps. "A piston pump is much more fuel efficient because it only uses energy when the hydraulics are in use," says Bell.

Closed-center hydraulics have given way to a new open-centered, excavator-style hydraulic system, developed as part of the company's joint venture with Hitachi. "Loaders have always used a closed-center system," Bell notes. "Open center allows for load feedback through the system and better, quicker response." These systems tend to be more reliable, as well, he adds.

Intelligence by Design

"The big change to the Z7 is the intelligence we've added to the machines," Bell asserts. The IntelliTech Operating System uses logic and intelligence to adjust operating characteristics to the applications and conditions. The operator can set a variety of functions to allow the machine to fit production needs. Power settings, lift arm kickout settings, declutch setting and even the way the transmission shifts can be adjusted to fit the application.

The patented "IntelliDig" system is designed to sense if the hydraulics are being overloaded during the digging process. As the machine and bucket move forward into the pile and the loader boom is raised, it could overpower the hydraulics if the force is too high, Bell comments. "If the system senses it is in that type of digging condition, it adjusts to balance the rimpull and breakout force," he explains.

Other IntelliTech system functions include Quick Cycle, Flex-Shift, Efficient Acceleration, Smooth Shift, shockless declutch and available auto idle shutdown.

Standard Features Add Value

With Tier 4i technology and the enhanced functionality, the overall cost of the loaders will undoubtedly be higher than their predecessors. However, the cost is quickly absorbed by the inclusion of numerous previously optional features as standard equipment.

The totally redesigned operator station provides better visibility, reduced sound, improved ventilation and improved controllability. A sophisticated dash monitor - incorporating a standard rear-view camera - provides a wide range of operating data, as well as the ability to adjust systems and provide fuel economy data on request. The cab also includes an air ride seat with optional heating, hydraulic-over-hydraulic pilot controls, thermostatically controlled air conditioning, better ductwork throughout, a four-fold increase in cab pressurization, lots of available storage and even an AM/FM/CD radio.

On the service end, standard HN bushings in the linkage system extend grease intervals to 500 hours. The use of KCM EX46 hydraulic oil allows for hydraulic oil change intervals to be doubled to 4,000 hours.

"If you run the numbers and do an apples to apples comparison with the older models, the price increase is almost offset by the standard equipment content," Bell asserts. When added to the gains in fuel efficiency, any additional cost is rapidly recovered.
 
 
Kawasaki launches new Z7 wheel loaders - March 28, 2012 - Equipment World - Online
http://www.equipmentworld.com/kawasaki-launches-new-z7-wheel-loaders/

Kawasaki (KCMA Corporation) launched the first two models of the Z7 wheel loader series, the 85Z7 and 90Z7, at an event held Wednesday. Featuring a ground-up redesign, the loaders meet EPA Tier 4 Interim emissions standards and offer a range of intelligent controls.

The 221 net horsepower 85Z7 has a 4.8-cubic-yard general purpose bucket and is powered by an Isuzu engine. The 90Z7 has a Hino diesel engine that delivers 280 net horsepower and uses either a 5.5-cubic-yard general purpose bucket or a 6.1-cubic-yard material handling bucket.

Improvements over previous wheel loader models include new powertrain components, new hydraulic and electrical systems and a redesigned operator's station that boosts visibility and reduces sound levels. To simplify maintenance, the Z7 models use HN bushings in the linkage system to extend grease intervals to 500 hours. Variable displacement piston pumps used in an excavator-style hydraulic system reduces fuel usage, and the IntelliDig system assists in digging tough materials.

For more information on the Z7 series, visit kawasakiloaders.com/Z7
 
 
Weitsman Plans Large Investment at Binghamton, N.Y., Plant - March 7, 2012 - Recycling Today - Online
http://www.recyclingtoday.com/ben-weitsman-binghampton-renovation.aspx

Weitsman will purchase new equipment, including Sennebogen cranes and Kawasaki loaders, new digital scales and other capital investments to help guarantee efficiency, quality and customer satisfaction, he says.

Weitsman says every scrap facility in the Ben Weitsman family of companies will be operating with state-of-the-art equipment and with efforts to minimize the impact on the surrounding environment and neighborhood. The company has 11 facilities.
 
 
Kawasaki Compact Wheel Loaders - November 2011 - Equipment Today - Print
The .78-cu.-yd. 42ZV-2 and 1.18-cu.-yd. 45ZV-2 feature a standard quick coupler, third spool hydraulics and Kubota Tier 4 Interim emissions-compliant engines.
 •  Electronically controlled Hydrostatic powertrain
 •  Heavy box frames
 •  HN Bushing technology, easy access electrical relays and a side-by-side aluminum radiator and oil cooler provide easy access for maintenance
 •  Rubber-mounted cab with suspension seat